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Showing posts from February, 2009

Names in the Dust

Have you ever wondered what Jesus may have written when he stooped down and wrote on the ground in John 8? This is one of the most intense scenes we see of Jesus' ministry. Tensions are high. His answer to the Pharisees question will bring him certain doom, either from the Jews or the Romans. He's in a no-win situation. All eyes are on him. The very life of this woman hangs in the balance. And what does he do? He seemingly ignores everyone. The suspense of the moment is tight; everyone's waiting and watching, yet he stoops down and draws in the dirt. Twice! What was he writing? One possibility may be found in Jeremiah 17:13, "LORD, the hope of Israel, all who abandon You will be put to shame. All who turn away from Me will be written in the dirt, for they have abandoned the fountain of living water, the LORD." Think about the situation. The Pharisees and scribes, the religious leaders of the day, the ones who are supposedly the upright a…

Scream Free Parenting

On campus this weekend at Harding was Hal Runkle, author of the book Scream Free Parenting. He spoke in chapel Friday morning and then held a seminar Friday night and this morning. His take on parenting seems to be quite different than much that I have heard. I would highly recommend his book and the other resources offered by his company, Scream Free Living. Check them out at www.screamfree.com

What if...

After hearing this speech by Ron Paul, I think he is the type of leadership our country desperately needs in Washington. (Thanks to my friend Jon for pointing out this video for me) The two lines that I found particularly convicting were: "What if we wake up one morning and realize that the terrorist threat is a predictable effect of our meddling in the affairs of others..?" "What if Christianity actually teaches peace...?" _____________________________ On a different note, we found out some exciting news tonight. Katelyn is going to have the chance this summer to get her Field Experience for psychology at the Child Haven children's home in Alabama. God has been working to get us to Alabama. This is the answer to many prayers. Please keep praying for us that this summer may be a chance for us to grow and to have an impact on others.

One sad, sad man

As I've been reading through the Old Testament this semester, I have read through some very sad, depressing stories about people who begin to rely on themselves instead of God. For instance - the fall of man, the tower flood story, the tower of Babel, the death of Moses, the inability of the Israelites to drive out the Canaanites, the stories found in Judges or Abimilech, Samson, and the Levite in Benjamin. I could go on. But the saddest, most pathetic, most pitiable characters I have encountered so far is King Saul. When we start out, he is anointed by Samuel as the king for whom Israel had been praying. But as the story progresses, we see "the Lord's anointed" fall into a moral tailspin. He begins to rely completely on himself and turns his back on God. He begins by disobeying God and blaming others for his mistakes. Then he flat out rejects God to the point that God regretted he ever made Saul to be king. What starts out as a little rebellion quickly escalates in…

Spending the summer in Athens....Alabama, not Greece

I posted a couple weeks ago about Harding's "C-Harmony" - aka Speed dating for internships. I'm happy to announce, after much prayer and deliberation, that I will be the youth intern for the Central Church of Christ in Athens, Alabama. I know this is going to be a great opportunity for me to grow in my experience and understanding of ministry. I will definitely keep you all posted throughout the summer and even throughout the semester as I prepare for this. We are also hope that it works out for Katelyn to work with one of the elders of Central who has his own counseling practice. Please keep us and the Central church in your prayers.

Getting all Philosophical again

Here are some ideas that have been running through my head over the last few days. A lot of it is along the lines of Plato, who happens to be my favorite Greek philosopher. It's part philosophy, part theology, and a dash of psychology. I hope it doesn't come out too confusing.... There is a law in physics which says that everything which happens has a cause, and nothing which is caused to happen can be greater than the cause. Energy is (in a way) lost. There is also a law which I have observed (a more philosophical/subjective law) which says that nothing created can ever be as good as the creator. For example, a human will never create a robot which is as "good"/perfect (mentally, emotionally, socially, etc.) as the human creator. A poet can only create a poem that is limited by linguistics. The written or spoken words, however, will never be as "good"/perfect as the original ideas within the mind of the poet. The artist can only do so much under the limi…

Expelled

So tonight's movie at Harding was Expelled, a documentary by Ben Stein concerning the issue of intelligent design. He raised many good points in the interviews he conducted with scientists on both sides of the Intelligent Design v. Evolution debate. Much of the movie was concerned with the simple fact that there is no "academic freedom" in the world of science. Those who dare question Darwinian evolution are "black listed" - they have lost their jobs and careers, have received threatening/hateful mail, and have become a laughing stock of the scientific community. All this simply because they are dissatisfied with the blanket "answers" provided by Darwin's theory. One main goal of his documentary was to show the devolution of morality and ethics in lieu of Darwinian evolution (natural selection, etc.). The climax (of sorts) of the movie was his discussion about Hitler and the Nazi regime - how they played off of evolutionary principles in order to…

Thoughts on Faith

In one of my classes, Advanced Intro to the Old Testament, we are assigned to read through the entire Old Testament in one semester. It's going to be a challenge, but I hope to keep up with it. In reading through the Pentateuch, Torah, Law, whatever you want to call it, I noticed something. Several things, actually, but I will only touch on one right now: We live in an age of postmodernism, which is really just a pendulum swing away from modernism. During the age of modernism, the western world became obsessed with proof. Everything we could "know" for sure was that which the sciences could measure, test, observe, reproduce, record, i.e. "prove." This was troublesome when it came to the existence of God. Since science could not "prove" God, He must not exist. Then we saw a response in the area of "Christian scientists" who pushed for the science of intelligent design to be added to the curriculum in schools across America. The idea is that…